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Self-employed file for unemployment

Creative Cuts owner Debbie Perazzo files for unemployment provided by the CARES Act through a website set up by Nevada's Department of Education, Training, and Rehabilitation.
Creative Cuts owner Debbie Perazzo files for unemployment provided by the CARES Act through a website set up by Nevada's Department of Education, Training, and Rehabilitation.(KOLO)
Published: May. 18, 2020 at 3:50 PM PDT
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We're three days into the application process and already KOLO 8 is hearing back from many of you about your experiences.

Nevada's Department of Employment, Training, and Rehabilitation (DETR) launched a website Saturday May 16 for self-employed, independent contractors, and gig workers among others who do not qualify for unemployment insurance through the State of Nevada to apply for unemployment compensation through the CARES Act.

"I really do appreciate all the work and effort that has gone into it. I'm sure it was a lot of work," said Creative Cuts owner, Debbie Perazzo.

Many filers were greeted with delays and frozen computer screens.

"It was a little rougher than I thought," Debbie admitted.

The pandemic force her to close March 17. She says she reopened a month and a half later.

"After two months, I would have had to close the doors (for good)," Debbie.

She spent seven hours on her computer last weekend to try and get back what was lost through no fault of her own. Her hair salon is located at 960 Auction Road in Fallon.

Debbie says she encountered some difficulties while applying.

"This is supposed to be for the self-employed, but the questions are as if I'm an employee," she said.

She says one of the questions she was asked is, "'When you were separated from your employer did you receive any vacation pay, holiday pay, sick pay, bonus pay?' I didn't have any of that because I'm self-employed."

"How many times did you go through one question over and over and over?" asked KOLO 8 Evening Anchor, Noah Bond.

"Probably around 20 times," Debbie.

"That you would answer the same question?" Bond.

"Same question," Debbie.

"Because it was doing what?" Bond.

"It wasn't saving what I had filled out," Debbie.

After five hours of work on Saturday she says she gave up for the day.

"How are you feeling at this point?" Bond.

"Frustrated, but finally decided you know I'm just going to put it down," Debbie.

Bond talked with Debbie's husband Alan Perazzo about the help he offered over the weekend.

"You told me the computer was stalling on your wife. What did you do?" Bond.

"After a day and a half of frustration I told my wife we've got to call the number and then a lady came on from a call center in Virginia and explained to us the system was overloaded," Alan.

Debbie continued to file her claim Sunday morning. She says it was accepted after another two hours of work, which equals seven total hours to file her claim over the weekend.

"Your feeling when it was finally accepted?" Bond.

"Ah it was elation. I was just I'm going, 'Yes, I'm done,'" Debbie.

DETR Director Heather Korbulic prepared self-employed workers with information warning as many as 70,000 people could apply for this help.

Copyright KOLO-TV 2020

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