Nevada Legislature: Democrats to push for Nevada state workers union

(KGWN)
Published: Mar. 27, 2017 at 8:08 PM PDT
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Nevada Democrats want to give state employees the ability to organize and negotiate work conditions.

Private employees and certain workers paid by local governments including teachers and police can unionize.

But Nevada is among more than 28 states that prohibit state workers from collective bargaining.

Senate Bill 486 would allow those employees to band together and negotiate wages, overtime, vacation days and leave provisions.

State information technicians, tax examiners, conservationists, secretaries, some corrections officers and highway patrollers are among the myriad state workers who would be covered.

The proposal could be a rallying point for Democrats at the Legislature.

It would face a steep hurdle at the desk of Republican Gov. Brian Sandoval.

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A Las Vegas Democrat wants Nevada to annually rank companies operating in the state by how fairly they pay men and women.

The Nevada Commission for Women would conduct a review each year of gender equality at companies with 100 or more employees under Assembly Bill 423.

The study introduced Monday would have the commission procure enough data to establish a "gender equality index" and use that to score workplaces.

The index would be published online.

The commission could give employers poor marks if they do not respond to Assemblywoman Brittney Miller's proposed study, which would begin this year.

At least two other Democratic proposals are seeking additional compensation data from businesses to look for pay disparities between genders.

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Assemblyman James Ohrenschall wants to give criminals the option to pay to videoconference their friends and family from prison or jail.

Offenders could also use telecommunications devices for research under the Las Vegas Democrat's proposal.

The Department of Corrections would work out the specifics of Assembly Bill 420, including the devices, applications and fees involved.

Another proposal would remove a cap on how much money a notary can charge for services provided electronically, currently set at $10.

Assembly Bill 413 would recommend they charge $25 to verify legal signatures.

The Assembly Judiciary Committee's bill would also open the door to videoconference notarizations.

Both measures were published on Monday.

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A Sparks Democrat wants physicians to cut off life support within 24 hours of a patient being declared brain-dead in Nevada with or without family consent.

A person is defined as dead under state law when their circulatory, respiratory or entire brain function has ended.

Making that determination would require no permissions from family members or authorized representatives under Assemblyman Michael Sprinkle's proposal.

Assembly Bill 424 would also require doctors to follow a specific 2010 guideline published in the American Academy of Neurology to decide whether someone is brain dead.

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Drugs that can counter the effects of an opioid overdose would be required on all Nevada public school campuses under a bill state lawmakers are introducing.

It would mandate all public and charter schools keep at least two doses of naloxone hydrochloride or other emergency opioid medications on site.

It would also allow pharmacists to dispense the medication to any individuals without a prescription.

Members of the Assembly Health and Human Services Committee are responding to an opioid epidemic that's killed at least 165,000 Americans since 2000.

They introduced Assembly Bill 428 Monday.

Prescription painkillers OxyContin, Vicodin and Percocet are among the most widely prescribed and deadly drugs. Heroin is also an opioid.

Other states have recently required or authorized schools to maintain the antidote alongside epinephrine pens and inhalers.

(Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

 

8:40 p.m.
Nevada Democrats want to give state employees the ability to organize and negotiate work conditions.
Private employees and certain workers paid by local governments including teachers and police can unionize.
But Nevada is among more than 28 states that prohibit state workers from collective bargaining.
Senate Bill 486 would allow those employees to band together and negotiate wages, overtime, vacation days and leave provisions.
State information technicians, tax examiners, conservationists, secretaries, some corrections officers and highway patrollers are among the myriad state workers who would be covered.
The proposal could be a rallying point for Democrats at the Legislature.
It would face a steep hurdle at the desk of Republican Gov. Brian Sandoval.