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California’s Sierra snowpack lags despite recent big storms

Sean de Guzman, chief of snow surveys for the California Department of Water Resources,...
Sean de Guzman, chief of snow surveys for the California Department of Water Resources, measures the depth of the snowpack during the second snow survey of the season at Phillips Station near Echo Summit, Calif., Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021. The survey found the snowpack at 63 inches deep with a water content of 17 inches. (AP Photo/Randall Benton)(Randall Benton | AP)
Published: Feb. 3, 2021 at 4:24 PM PST
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(AP) — Recent storms have boosted California’s Sierra Nevada snowpack but not enough to fully compensate for a dry start to winter.

Measurements Wednesday found the water content of the snowpack is 70% of average to date.

Department of Water Resources snow survey chief Sean de Guzman says the water supply outlook has improved but the state is not out of the woods.

The Sierra snowpack typically supplies about 30% of California’s water needs when spring comes and it begins to melt and runoff into aqueducts and reservoirs. De Guzman notes that February is normally one of the three wettest months and could help make up the deficit.

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