Data Sharing Among Nations Rebooted Another Decade

By: AP Email
By: AP Email
Diplomats and officials from 90 nations have agreed to share thousands of observations from satellites, airplanes and ground sensing equipment about our planet for a second decade.

In this undated image released by NASA taken by the WISE telescope showing a massive star plowing through space dust. The result is a brilliant bow shock, seen here as a yellow arc. The first batch of data from a NASA mission to map the entire sky has been released to scientists and anyone with an Internet connection. The catalog made public this week includes millions of galaxies, stars, asteroids and other celestial objects. (AP Photo/NASA)

GENEVA (AP) - Diplomats and officials from 90 nations have agreed to share thousands of observations from satellites, airplanes and ground sensing equipment about our planet for a second decade.

An intergovernmental organization known as Group on Earth Observations, or GEO, which was established in February 2005, says it won unanimous approval Friday to share open data from space, airborne and ground observations for another 10 years.

The European environment commissioner, Janez Potocnik, said the data will help inform decision-making about agriculture, biodiversity, climate, disasters, ecosystems, energy, health, water and weather.

China's science and technology vice minister, Cao Jianlin, says his country is partnering with 46 others in GEO to measure natural and human effects on the carbon cycle, the first such coordinated effort at the global level.


KOLO-TV 4850 Ampere Drive Reno, NV 89502
Gray Television, Inc. - Copyright © 2002-2014 - Designed by Gray Digital Media - Powered by Clickability 240887661 - kolotv.com/a?a=240887661