New Storm Keeps Officials On Guard

By: Staff
By: Staff

As a new storm brought more rain, local
emergency management officials kept up their guard after the Reno
area's worst flooding in nine years.
Kaydie Paschall, coordinator of the Community Emergency Response
Team, said authorities were still closely monitoring the Truckee,
Carson and Walker rivers.
"At this point, there are cleanup efforts to remove debris,"
she said Sunday. "But sandbags aren't being removed until the next
storm system passes. Why risk it?"
Paschall said officials also were trying to assess the damage of
the worst flooding since a New Year's Day 1997 flood caused $1
billion in damage in northern Nevada.
Officials said the worst-hit area appeared to be the Sparks
industrial area, where an undetermined number of businesses along
the Truckee were under up to 4 feet of water.
On the Carson River to the south, at least 12 homes and two
businesses were flooded in Carson City, while two homes, 10
residential garages, three businesses and a fourplex were flooded
downstream in the Dayton area, they said.
"It's just a mess. Our garage is flooded and our computer room
is flooded," Ann Erwin of Carson City told the Nevada Appeal.
"It's a bad way to start the year but we'll get through it."
In the Sierra Nevada, Interstate 80 was completely reopened
Sunday, a day after mudslides shut down the entire roadway about 25
miles west of Reno.
California Department of Transportation officials had originally
expected the interstate - the major link between northern
California and Reno - to remain closed at least until Monday.
But spokesman Mark Dinger said crews worked overnight to remove
more than 130 truckloads of rock and dirt after heavy rain
temporarily ended.
"Thanks to a lot of hard work ... we're going to meet the needs
of the traveling public for the holiday weekend," said Will
Kempton, California state transportation director.
Six truck rigs were caught in mudslides in the area early
Saturday, but no injuries were reported.
A major concern Sunday was the Dayton area, where authorities
were working to save at least one home and several outbuildings
from flood waters.
The Carson crested Sunday afternoon at about 2.5 feet above
flood stage there.
"The Carson is moving fast. You can see tree limbs and other
debris speed past," said Lyon County sheriff's Capt. Jeff Page.
"Last week it was moving like a mosquito and today it's moving
like an F-18 jet."
The Truckee River was below flood stage Sunday in Reno, and no
new problems were reported on it.
Gary Barbato, hydrologist with the National Weather Service in
Reno, said he did not expect the new storm to cause similar
flooding on the Truckee and Carson rivers.
While the storm was expected to bring up to 1 inch more of rain
to the Reno area, he said, the snow level should be lower.
"I don't foresee a repeat of yesterday's flooding because the
next system will be much colder," Barbato said Sunday.
The storm that triggered the flooding brought up to 2 inches of
rain to valley floors and 8 inches of rain to the Sierra Nevada.
In Carson City, flooding left Mo and Sluggo's Bar and Grill in
2½ inches of water.
"I have been keeping track and we have bailed about 400 gallons
of water out, five gallons at a time," said Mitch Fanning, husband
of bartender Trish Fanning.
In Reno, the weather cost the city its annual downtown New
Year's Eve fireworks show.
The show had been rescheduled for Sunday night, but officials
decided to scrap it after the new storm brought more rain and high
winds.
Flooding also hampered crews in their effort to set up the show.

Kaydie Paschall, coordinator of the Community Emergency Response
Team, said authorities were still closely monitoring the Truckee,
Carson and Walker rivers.
"At this point, there are cleanup efforts to remove debris,"
she said Sunday. "But sandbags aren't being removed until the next
storm system passes. Why risk it?"
Paschall said officials also were trying to assess the damage of
the worst flooding since a New Year's Day 1997 flood caused $1
billion in damage in northern Nevada.
Officials said the worst-hit area appeared to be the Sparks
industrial area, where an undetermined number of businesses along
the Truckee were under up to 4 feet of water.
On the Carson River to the south, at least 12 homes and two
businesses were flooded in Carson City, while two homes, 10
residential garages, three businesses and a fourplex were flooded
downstream in the Dayton area, they said.
"It's just a mess. Our garage is flooded and our computer room
is flooded," Ann Erwin of Carson City told the Nevada Appeal.
"It's a bad way to start the year but we'll get through it."
In the Sierra Nevada, Interstate 80 was completely reopened
Sunday, a day after mudslides shut down the entire roadway about 25
miles west of Reno.
California Department of Transportation officials had originally
expected the interstate - the major link between northern
California and Reno - to remain closed at least until Monday.
But spokesman Mark Dinger said crews worked overnight to remove
more than 130 truckloads of rock and dirt after heavy rain
temporarily ended.
"Thanks to a lot of hard work ... we're going to meet the needs
of the traveling public for the holiday weekend," said Will
Kempton, California state transportation director.
Six truck rigs were caught in mudslides in the area early
Saturday, but no injuries were reported.
A major concern Sunday was the Dayton area, where authorities
were working to save at least one home and several outbuildings
from flood waters.
The Carson crested Sunday afternoon at about 2.5 feet above
flood stage there.
"The Carson is moving fast. You can see tree limbs and other
debris speed past," said Lyon County sheriff's Capt. Jeff Page.
"Last week it was moving like a mosquito and today it's moving
like an F-18 jet."
The Truckee River was below flood stage Sunday in Reno, and no
new problems were reported on it.
Gary Barbato, hydrologist with the National Weather Service in
Reno, said he did not expect the new storm to cause similar
flooding on the Truckee and Carson rivers.
While the storm was expected to bring up to 1 inch more of rain
to the Reno area, he said, the snow level should be lower.
"I don't foresee a repeat of yesterday's flooding because the
next system will be much colder," Barbato said Sunday.
The storm that triggered the flooding brought up to 2 inches of
rain to valley floors and 8 inches of rain to the Sierra Nevada.
In Carson City, flooding left Mo and Sluggo's Bar and Grill in
2½ inches of water.
"I have been keeping track and we have bailed about 400 gallons
of water out, five gallons at a time," said Mitch Fanning, husband
of bartender Trish Fanning.
In Reno, the weather cost the city its annual downtown New
Year's Eve fireworks show.
The show had been rescheduled for Sunday night, but officials
decided to scrap it after the new storm brought more rain and high
winds.
Flooding also hampered crews in their effort to set up the show.


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