Nine baskets retrieved from CA on display at Reno colony

These are water jugs repatriated to the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony from California. RSIC photo.
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RENO, Nev. (KOLO) - The Reno-Sparks Indian Colony retrieved nine baskets from the Placer County Museum and put them on display for the first time Saturday.

"For hundreds of years in this country, Native American cultural items including items of cultural significance--funerary objects, sacred items and ancestral remains--were looted for museum collections and for certain science communities to study the 'vanishing Native American race,'" Michon R. Eben, RSIC Cultural Resource Manager, said in a statement. "This repatriation of Native American cultural items is very important for our native communities and for the descendants of those people who left them."

The Culture of Weaving: Traditional Baskets in Transition will be on display Monday through Thursday from noon to 4 p.m. at the 1995 E. Second St. through Aug. 31.

The nine baskets are six water jugs, two winnowing baskets and one medium cone basket. They will be on display with Paiute, Shoshone and Washoe baskets.

The RSIC Cultural Resource Program gave evidence and testimony to convince the Placer County Museum that the nine baskets are of "cultural patrimony" as defined by the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act, RSIC said in a statement.

Part of the evidence Eben provided was documentation of the unique art piece hanging in the lobby of the Reno-Sparks Tribal Health Center— a giant replica of a water jug. The Paiute, Shoshone and Washoe used those woven water jugs to survive.


The Reno-Sparks Indian Colony provided this photograph of a burden basket that the colony repatriated from California.
The Reno-Sparks Indian Colony provided this photograph of a burden basket that the colony repatriated from California.