Owens River Fire containment up to 98%

This is a photograph of a retardant drop on the Owens River Fire provided by Justin Benttinen via Inciweb.
By  | 

MONO COUNTY, Calif. (KOLO)-- Friday update:
The fire is 98% contained, with full containment the goal by October 15.

Monday update:
The cost of the fire is estimated to be $3,900,000.00. The cause of the fire, which is 85% contained, is under investigation.

Friday update:
The Owens River Fire remains at 5,443 acres and is 75% contained. Minimal fire activity occurred overnight with cooler temperatures helping to keep the fire line in check. Crews began demobilizing on 9/22 and will continue throughout the weekend. Today, firefighters will be mopping up and backhauling equipment in all divisions. Fire behavior is expected to be minimal with a warming and drying trend predicted throughout the weekend. Fire officials will be opening up some roads to public traffic outside of the fire area starting tomorrow (Saturday). The Owens River Road remains closed and the public is asked to stay out of this area to keep it safe for firefighters who are still working in the vicinity. The Big Springs Campground, Clark Canyon, and nearby ranches and developments have been evacuated and those areas remain closed. There are 12 hand crews, 48 engines, 7 helicopters, 2 dozers, and 5 water tenders assigned to the fire. There are 541 personnel working on the incident. The cost of the fire is estimated to be $2,900,000.00. The cause of the fire is under investigation.

Wednesday evening update:
The Owens River Fire is now 43 percent contained and is in mop-up, the U.S. Forest Service reported.

So far the fire has cost an estimated $2 million to fight. The cause remains under investigation.

There were isolated showers over the fire on Wednesday and there’s more chance of rain tonight. Fire crews will continue mop up if it is safe, the Forest Service said.

Temperatures should be cooler on Thursday.

The Big Springs Campground, Clark Canyon and nearby ranches and developments remain evacuated.

The Forest Service said there are 16 hand crews, 48 engines, seven helicopters, six bulldozers and seven water tenders along with 636 people assigned to the incident.

Wednesday morning update:
Containment has risen to 32% and the size of the Owens River Fire north of Mammoth Lakes has been downgraded to 5.443 acres.

The cause has still not been determined. Containment is the goal by September 30.

Tuesday morning update:
Containment remains at 20% as of September 20, with 6,050 acres having burned. September 30 is the targeted containment date.

4:43 a.m. Monday update:

A Owens River Fire in Mono County has burned 6,000 acres.

The Inyo National Forest reports that the fire burning north of Owens River Road east of U.S. 395 appears to be human-caused, but the origin remains under investigation. It is 20 percent contained.

Smoke can be seen from several places along U.S. 395, including Bishop, Mammoth Lakes, June Lake and Lee Vining, the Inyo National Forest reports.

Due to heavy smoke in the Mammoth Lakes area, the Mono County Health Department asks the public to refrain from heavy exertion outside.

Most fire crews are along the Owens River Road to protect nearby private developments and ranches. The Big Springs Campground, Clark Canyon and nearby ranches and developments have been evacuated, the Inyo National Forest reported It is burning in sagebrush and Jeffrey pine.

Firefighters expect dry, warm winds through Monday and then increasing winds as a new weather system moves in.

There were about 250 firefighters on the blaze now on Sunday morning.

Original story:

A brush fire estimated to be 500 acres is burning in Mono County north of Owens River Road and east of U.S. 395, the U.S. Forest Service Inyo National Forest reports.

Smoke can be seen along U.S. 395, including Bishop, Mammoth Lakes, June Lake and Lee Vining, the Inyo National Forest said.

It is burning in sagebrush and Jeffrey pine. Fire crews are focusing along Owens River Road to protect homes and ranches.

The Big Springs Campground, Clark Canyon and nearby ranches and developments have been evacuated.

The cause of the fire is under investigation.






Photo courtesy US Forest Service
This is the Owens River Fire in a photo provided by the Inyo National Forest through Inciweb.
This is a photograph of a retardant drop on the Owens River Fire provided by Justin Benttinen via Inciweb.