Contact Information
18 Stewart Street
Reno, NV 89501
Phone: 775-856-3839 or 800-379-3839
Fax 775-348-7591

Web links
* Main webpage - www.diabetesnv.org
* Donate page – www.diabetesnv.org/donate

Did you know that there are several types of diabetes? Type 1, 2, Gestational and Pre.

WHAT ARE THE DIFFERENT TYPES OF DIABETES? TYPE 1 – INSULIN DEPENDENT: Type 1 diabetes is believed to be caused by a genetic predisposition and considered an autoimmune disease in which the human immune system attacks the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas and destroys them. Consequently, the pancreas produces little or no insulin. A person with Type 1 diabetes needs daily injections of insulin to live. Type 1 develops most often in children and young adults, but can occur at any age. Type 1 diabetes accounts for 10% of diagnosed diabetes cases in the U.S. WARNING SIGNS OF TYPE 1 include: Frequent urination Rapid weight loss, Abnormal thirst Unusual hunger, Irritability Obvious weakness, Fatigue Blurred vision, Nausea and vomiting, These symptoms appear suddenly. See a doctor immediately. If not diagnosed and treated a person can lapse into a life-threatening coma. TYPE 2: is called "2" because it requires TWO causes: congenital and acquired and TWO mechanisms: insulin resistance and beta cell fatigue and the insulin resistance has TWO problems: Decreased glucose uptake in TWO tissues (Muscle and fat), increased glucose production by the liver. Type 2 usually occurs after the age of 30 but can also occur in children and teens. About 80% of people with Type 2 are overweight. Symptoms may include any of the signs and symptoms listed under Type 1 or: Drowsiness/lack of energy Itching, A family history of diabetes Excessive weight, Tingling, numbness in the feet Frequent infection, Slow healing of sores, Any one of these signals can mean diabetes. See your doctor at once.

Did you know that getting Type 1 diabetes has nothing to do with diet exercise or family history?
Autoimmune disease in which the human immune system attacks the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas and destroys them. Consequently, the pancreas produces little or no insulin.

Did you know that every 17 seconds someone in the US is diagnosed with a type of diabetes?

Today more than 5200 people will be diagnosed with diabetes – the majority of them with type 2 diabetes. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, nearly 26 million children and adults have diabetes in the United States. Out of that number, nearly 95% have type 2 diabetes. If left uncontrolled, diabetes can lead to serious complications including heart attack, stroke, kidney disease, blindness, amputation and even death.

Did you know that 7 million people have undiagnosed diabetes?

25.8 million Americans have diabetes — 8.3 percent of the U.S. population. Of these, 7 million do not know they have the disease. In 2010, about 1.9 million people ages 20 or older were diagnosed with diabetes. The number of people diagnosed with diabetes has risen from 1.5 million in 1958 to 18.8 million in 2010, an increase of epidemic proportions. It is estimated that 79 million adults aged 20 and older have pred-iabetes. Pre-diabetes is a condition where blood glucose levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be called diabetes. Studies have shown that by losing weight and increasing physical activity people can prevent or delay pre-diabetes from progressing to diabetes.

Did you know that excessive thirst, urinating and weight loss are red flags for type 1 diabetes and that your child should be tested?
WARNING SIGNS OF TYPE 1 include: Frequent urination Rapid weight loss, Abnormal thirst Unusual hunger, Irritability Obvious weakness, Fatigue Blurred vision, Nausea and vomiting, These symptoms appear suddenly. See a doctor immediately. If not diagnosed and treated a person can lapse into a life-threatening coma.

Did you know that making a few changes in your diet and adding more activities can help prevent type 2 diabetes?

There is good news, however. Results from the landmark Diabetes Prevention Program show that even moderate lifestyle changes can make a big difference in preventing Type 2 diabetes and can even reverse the pre-diabetes condition in some people. Metformin, a Type 2 diabetes medication, was also shown to be beneficial to some individuals with pre-diabetes/impaired glucose tolerance. If you are at risk for pre-diabetes, or even if you have it now, losing excess weight through proper diet and exercise can improve the body’s ability to use insulin and to process glucose more efficiently. Exercise. If you do not do it now, get started. Surprisingly, seven in ten Americans don't engage in any type of regular physical activity. Yet a regular, moderate exercise program of just thirty minutes a day five days a week can greatly reduce your risk of diabetes. It does not have to be fancy- a brisk walk, outdoor play with the kids or even working in the yard burns calories and gets your body moving. Always check with your physician before starting a new fitness program, especially if you have a chronic illness or other health problems. Eat right. If you are overweight, you will need to reduce calorie intake and cut fats. A Registered Dietitian or Certified Diabetes Educator can help you develop a food plan that works for you. If you are a self-starter, try following the food pyramid for healthier eating habits. Again, touch base with your doctor if you have pre-existing health conditions. Talk to your doctor. New screening guidelines issued by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) call for physicians to test overweight individuals over the age of 45 with a fasting blood glucose test and/or oral glucose tolerance test. Fit the profile? Talk to your doctor today and get tested.

Did you know that 8.2% of the population in Nevada has one of the types of diabetes?
Research indicates that diabetes is one of the most controllable and often rising preventable chronic diseases. Despite this promising research, diabetes prevalence is high, increasing in Nevada from 4.2% in 1996 to 7.9% in 2009. In comparison, national diabetes prevalence increased from 4.5% in 1996 to 8.3 % in 2009. By 2050, as many as 1 in 3 U.S. adults could have diabetes if current trends continue, according to a new analysis from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Diabetes prevalence is expected to rise sharply over the next 40 years due to the aging of the U.S. population, the increase of obesity and physical inactivity, increases in minority groups that are at high risk for type 2 diabetes, and people with diabetes living longer.

Did you know that Type 1 Diabetes is not preventable and can strike at any age?

Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism, the way our body processes and uses certain foods, especially carbohydrates. The human body normally converts carbohydrates to glucose, the simple sugar that is the main source of energy for the body's cells. To enter cells, glucose needs the help of insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas. The pancreas is supposed to automatically produce the right amount of insulin to allow glucose to enter body cells from the blood and be converted into energy. However, when the pancreas produces either little or no insulin or the body does not respond to the insulin produced, the body cannot process glucose. As a result, it builds up in the blood stream, overflows into the urine, and passes out of the body, effectively depriving the body of its main source of fuel. This can happen to the body at any age.

Did you know that 35% of adults (20 years plus) are walking around with un-diagnosed pre-diabetes in the US and that over 200,000 people die in the US annually?

Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death listed on U.S. death certificates. Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death among people with diabetes — about 68 percent die of heart disease or stroke. The overall risk for death among people with diabetes is about double that of people without diabetes.

Did you know that diabetes is one of the most preventable chronic diseases?

TAKE THE DIABETES RISK ANALYSIS:

Find out if you are at high risk of getting diabetes by answering and scoring the following statements:

1. I had a baby weighing more than nine pounds at birth or had diabetes during pregnancy.
• If you answered Yes give yourself a score of 6.
• If you answered No give yourself a score of 0.

2. I have a parent(s), sister, or brother with diabetes.
• If you answered Yes add 3 to your score.
• If you answered No add 0.

3. I consider myself Hispanic, African American, American Indian, Asian American, or Pacific Islander.
• If you answered Yes add 3 to your score.
• If you answered No add 0.

4. I am overweight.
• If you answered Yes add 3 to your score.
• If you answered No add 0.

5. I have been told I have a high blood sugar level.
• If you answered Yes add 6 to your score.
• If you answered No add 0.

6. I am between 45 and 64 years of age.
• If you answered Yes add 1 to your score.
• If you answered No add 0.

7. I am under 65 years of age AND I get little or no exercise during a usual day.
• If you answered Yes add 3 to your score.
• If you answered No add 0.

8. I am 65 years old or older.
• If you answered Yes add 3 to your score
• If you answered No add 0.

Now, add up your total score from items 1 through 8.

If you scored 1 to 5 points, you are probably at low risk for having diabetes now. But don't forget about it, especially if you are Hispanic, African American, Native American, Asian American or a Pacific Islander. If you scored 6 or more points, you are at high risk for having or getting diabetes. Only a doctor can determine if you have diabetes. If you have diabetes, we encourage you to share this information with your family members.

Did you know that people with diabetes have the same nutritional needs as a person that is not diabetic?

Proper diet is one of the important elements in managing diabetes. Because one type of diet does not fit all we recommend that you review your meal plan need with a qualified dietitian. There has been a great deal of confusing and contradictory information in the past about the diabetic diet. Low Carbohydrate vs Low Fat. Our purpose is to cut though the fads and direct you to the resources that can help you make healthy sensible food choices. Not all Carbohydrates are equal. Complex Carbohydrates are slower burning sugars. Lentils, Bulgar, Barley and Wheat kernels and other whole grains are examples of complex carbohydrates that have a low Glycemic rating and burn slowly. White rice, potatoes, white bread, and bagels are also carbohydrates and like simple sugars have a higher glycemic index. They can raise blood sugars more rapidly. To learn how different carbohydrates burn we recommend you check out David Mendoza's Glycemic Index Carbohydrates are present in all foods except fat and proteins such as meat, fish, and chicken. which have no or mere traces of carbohydrate. Counting Carbohydrates: Working out a daily meal plan that is based on the number of carbohydrate grams you eat each day can help keep Blood Glucose levels under control. Learning how to count carbohydrates is a very useful tool in keeping a proper balance between diet, exercise, insulin and oral diabetes medications, There are many useful tools that can help you get started, including books, Software and places on the net.. One of our most favorite sites for sensible eating information is The Nutrition Source a Web site maintained by the Department of Nutrition at the Harvard School of Public Health.

Did you know a person dies every 10 seconds internationally from complications from diabetes?
Every 10 seconds a person dies from diabetes-related causes. Every 10 seconds two people develop diabetes. (internationally) Each year a further 7 million people develop diabetes. Diabetes is the fourth leading cause of global death by disease. Each year 4 million deaths are attributable to diabetes. All diabetes is on the rise. Diabetes affects people of all ages. Care for people with diabetes is best when a multidisciplinary approach is adopted involving health professionals from all areas. Access to appropriate medication and care should be a right not a privilege. Diabetes costs more than money. Up to 60% of type 2 diabetes can be prevented. Diabetes brings different challenges at different ages. Diabetes hits the poorest hardest. Source: world diabetes day 2009-2013.

Did you know that diabetes is the leading cause of blindness and lower limb amputations?

Diabetes is the leading cause of adult blindness, kidney failure, and non-traumatic lower-limb amputations. Persons with diabetes are 2 to 4 times more likely to have heart disease and stroke than persons without the disease. Current scientific evidence demonstrates that much of the morbidity and mortality of diabetes can be prevented or delayed by aggressive treatment with diet, physical activity, and new pharmacology approaches to normalize blood sugar levels, blood pressure, and lipids. The good news is that research also shows that type 2 diabetes can be prevented or delayed by losing a modest amount of weight by getting 30 minutes of physical activity 5 days a week, and making healthy food choices.

Did you know that only 10% of the diabetes population has Type 1 Diabetes?

Type 1 diabetes is believed to be caused by a genetic predisposition and considered an autoimmune disease in which the human immune system attacks the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas and destroys them. Consequently, the pancreas produces little or no insulin. A person with Type 1 diabetes needs daily injections of insulin to live. Type 1 develops most often in children and young adults, but can occur at any age. Type 1 diabetes accounts for 10% of diagnosed diabetes cases in the U.S.

Did you know that people with diabetes are at greater risk of heart disease and stroke?

Diabetes is the leading cause of adult blindness, kidney failure, and non-traumatic lower-limb amputations. Persons with diabetes are 2 to 4 times more likely to have heart disease and stroke than persons without the disease. Current scientific evidence demonstrates that much of the morbidity and mortality of diabetes can be prevented or delayed by aggressive treatment with diet, physical activity, and new pharmacology approaches to normalize blood sugar levels, blood pressure, and lipids. The good news is that research also shows that type 2 diabetes can be prevented or delayed by losing a modest amount of weight by getting 30 minutes of physical activity 5 days a week, and making healthy food choices.

Did you know that Type 2 diabetes is one of the most manageable chronic health conditions?
There is good news, however. Results from the landmark Diabetes Prevention Program show that even moderate lifestyle changes can make a big difference in preventing Type 2 diabetes and can even reverse the pre-diabetes condition in some people. Metformin, a Type 2 diabetes medication, was also shown to be beneficial to some individuals with pre-diabetes/impaired glucose tolerance. If you are at risk for pre-diabetes, or even if you have it now, losing excess weight through proper diet and exercise can improve the body’s ability to use insulin and to process glucose more efficiently. Exercise. If you do not do it now, get started. Surprisingly, seven in ten Americans don't engage in any type of regular physical activity. Yet a regular, moderate exercise program of just thirty minutes a day five days a week can greatly reduce your risk of diabetes. It does not have to be fancy- a brisk walk, outdoor play with the kids or even working in the yard burns calories and gets your body moving. Always check with your physician before starting a new fitness program, especially if you have a chronic illness or other health problems. Eat right. If you are overweight, you will need to reduce calorie intake and cut fats. A Registered Dietitian or Certified Diabetes Educator can help you develop a food plan that works for you. If you are a self-starter, try following the food pyramid for healthier eating habits. Again, touch base with your doctor if you have pre-existing health conditions. Talk to your doctor. New screening guidelines issued by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) call for physicians to test overweight individuals over the age of 45 with a fasting blood glucose test and/or oral glucose tolerance test. Fit the profile? Talk to your doctor today and get tested.

Did you know that a diabetes lifestyle is just a healthy life style?

Did you know that you cannot get Type 1 diabetes from eating too much sugar?
Type 1 diabetes is believed to be caused by a genetic predisposition and considered an autoimmune disease in which the human immune system attacks the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas and destroys them. Consequently, the pancreas produces little or no insulin. A person with Type 1 diabetes needs daily injections of insulin to live. Type 1 develops most often in children and young adults, but can occur at any age. Type 1 diabetes accounts for 10% of diagnosed diabetes cases in the U.S.


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